Top 25 Valley View RV Park RV Rentals and Motorhome Rentals

RV Rental Valley View RV Park

Find the perfect RV rental in Valley View RV Park, NM. Simple, easy, and fully insured.

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All towables

Trailer

Trailers for all types of towing vehicles, including SUVs and pickups.

Folding Trailer

Trailers you can tow with passenger vehicles or SUVs. A great way to transform average cars into adventure cars.

Fifth-Wheel

Larger trailers that attach to towing vehicles with a gooseneck extension in the truck bed.

Toy Hauler

Living quarters in the front with dedicated space for hauling motorcycles or other “toys” in the back.

Utility Trailer

All other types of towable trailers.

All drivables

Class C

Popular with small families and first-time RV drivers who want a little more room than a van. Comparable to driving a truck.

Camper Van

The smallest and nimblest of fully enclosed RVs. Drives like a van. Loves posing for Instagram.

Class B

A formal-sounding name for camper van, but just as photogenic.

Class A

Drivers should be comfortable driving bus-sized vehicles and dealing with parking limitations. Great for delivery.

Truck Camper

If you can drive a truck, you can drive a truck camper. Makes roughing it significantly less rough.

Other

All other types of drivable vehicles.

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Discover Valley View RV Park


The vast deserts and soaring peaks of New Mexico are an adventurous RV traveler’s dream. Much of the state remains unexplored by travel magazines and more conventional tourists, with few straying from the familiar spots along Interstate 40 and 25. But if you enjoy getting off the tourist trail, then you’ll love the campsites at Valley View RV Park in Fort Sumner.

This is definitely a motorhome camping destination for those wanting some solitude. Fort Sumner is incredibly isolated, being about halfway between Albuquerque and Lubbock, TX (two and a half hours' drive to the west and east, respectively), and a 90-minute drive north of Roswell. Upon first glance, the featureless plains that cover eastern New Mexico are less than impressive, but upon further immersion, the landscapes have a unique beauty to them that will be appreciated by travelers looking to experience all that the Land of Enchantment has to offer.

Valley View RV Park is adjacent to Fort Sumner’s most popular attraction - the Billy the Kid Museum, and nearly in the center of town. Sites are spacious and include full hookups for your rental RV. It's centrally located inside a town, so there’s really no need for any other amenities, as supplies and recreation are easily found a short drive away.

The Great Outdoors

In a region with few mountains or rivers, finding outdoor recreation requires a little more creativity. If you’re looking for the familiar oasis in the desert, Sumner Lake State Park, a few miles north of town, will be just what you need. It features a 4,500-acre lake created by damming the Pecos River that flows through Fort Sumner. The lake has abundant stocks of largemouth bass, walleye, and catfish if you’ve brought your fishing gear. Kayak and canoe rentals are hard to come by, most likely requiring a visit to Albuquerque, so you’ll probably be limited to shore fishing on this trip.

Finding a good walking or cycling trail in this part of the state can also be challenging, but the Goodwin Lake Trail in nearby Clovis is an excellent path for doing both. The route circles a playa - a desert lake formed by rainwater, which dries out seasonally. It’s one of the few water features in the area and an interesting example of desert landscapes.

While it is almost three and a half hours' drive to the southwest, a visit to White Sands National Monument is a must whenever you stay in eastern New Mexico campgrounds. The fluffy, white gypsum sand dunes look like snowdrifts from afar, and a hike through them is definitely an otherworldly experience. If you want some truly unique photos for your Instagram feed, White Sands is a great place to shoot. Many visitors to the monument also rent sandboards or sleds to take an exhilarating ride down the dunes.

Exploring the City

Fort Sumner may be a lonely outpost in the desert, but fortunately, it has everything you need for a great RV rental trip. Valley View RV Park is right in the middle of town, so most of the places you’ll go are actually within walking distance. A few restaurants line its main street, serving up classic diner food and excellent Mexican cuisine. There’s also a grocery store in the center of town where you can pick up supplies to prepare a scrumptious meal back at the campground. If you need to fuel up your rig, there are a couple of gas stations near the intersection of Fourth Street and Sumner Avenue.

Fort Sumner is light on attractions, but it does have one thing going for it - famed outlaw Billy the Kid died here. A pilgrimage to his gravesite is a must for Wild West enthusiasts, but it's best to stop by the Billy the Kid Museum near the RV park to get some background information first. For a town in the middle of nowhere, this museum is jam-packed with authentic memorabilia from the man’s life, including his pistols and gunslinger chaps. Additional exhibits give context to the outlaw’s life, explaining the desperate conditions in New Mexico during the late 1800s that allowed for such lawlessness.

Another historical site you have to see while RV camping at Valley View RV Park is the Bosque Redondo Memorial. The museum sits on the ruins of Fort Sumner, where thousands of Native Americans were interned in the mid-1800s. Exhibits recount the tragedy of their imprisonment and the Treaty of Bosque Redondo that allowed them to return to their homeland a few years later.

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