Duck Mountain Provincial Park
Guide

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Introduction

Rolling hills, dense forests, and vibrant lakes make Duck Mountain Provincial Park a favorite destination for travelers in Saskatchewan, Canada. The park offers a variety of activities and accommodations for campers in every season. Locals fondly refer to the area as “The Duck.”

Duck Mountain Provincial Park is as family-friendly as they come with recreational options for every age and skill level. Three lakes set the scene for swimming and sunbathing, and the park also has facilities for mini-golf and tennis.

Fishermen can cast a line in search of pike, walleye, and perch. Bikers and hikers can hop on a segment of the Trans Canada Trail that weaves through the park as well as explore one of the many other interpretive and nature trails.

The area is great for wildlife watching, especially for large animals. Elk, black bear, moose, lynx, timber wolf, and bobcat find refuge in the park’s borders.

The park offers three campgrounds for RV camping: Birch, Poplar, and Spruce. All campsites have electric hookups, with 15 at Birch campground offering full hookups. Campers have access to service centers with flush toilets and showers. At Pickerel Point, guests can find the park store, concessions, and laundry facilities.

RV Rentals in Duck Mountain Provincial Park

Transportation in Duck Mountain Provincial Park

Driving

Duck Mountain Provincial Park covers 93 square miles (150 square km) of land and lakes about 9 miles (14 km) east of the town of Kamsack. The park’s eastern edge reaches the border of Saskatchewan and Manitoba.

Guests can access the park via Highway 57, which serves as a connector for Highway 5 and PTH 83.

Park roads are paved and maintained every season of the year, making it easy to navigate the area by RV or with a trailer in tow.

Storage is available inside the park on a daily or weekly basis for campers bringing their own recreational vehicles.

Parking at each campsite is limited to two vehicles and one watercraft. Additional parking is available at the visitor center and recreation hall.

Guests can also enter Duck Mountain Provincial Park on foot via one of the many hiking trails or on bicycle. A 3 mile (4.8 km) paved bike trail takes bikers through the forest and connects the recreation hall with Pickerel Point. All bicyclists under the age of 18 must wear a helmet.

Parking

Public Transport

Campgrounds and parking in Duck Mountain Provincial Park

Campsites in Duck Mountain Provincial Park

Reservations camping

Spruce Campground

Spruce Campground has 83 campsites for RV or trailer camping. Campers can access a service center with flush toilets and showers. Each site allows parking for two vehicles and one watercraft. Self-contained propane barbecues, fire pits, and other heating devices must be CSA approved and be set up on level gravel, dirt, or sand, safely away from grass or plants. Fire pits are scattered throughout the park and campground areas. Firewood is provided at no cost. Bears do live in the park, so store food and dispose of garbage in air-tight containers. At Pickerel Point, guests can find the park store, concessions, and laundry facilities.

Poplar Campground

Poplar Campground features 59 sites for RV or trailer camping with electric hookups. Campers can access a service center with flush toilets and showers. A sewage dump site is located in the campground. Each site allows parking for two vehicles and one watercraft. Self-contained propane barbeques, fire pits, and other heating devices must be CSA approved and be set up on level gravel, dirt, or sand, safely away from grass or plants. Fire pits are scattered throughout the park and campground areas. Firewood is provided at no cost. Bears do live in the park, so store food and dispose of garbage in air-tight containers. At Pickerel Point, guests can find the park store, concessions, and laundry facilities.

Birch Campground

Birch Campground features 207 sites for RV or trailer camping with electric hookups. Additionally, 15 of those sites offer full hookups. Campers can access a service center with flush toilets and showers. A sewage dump site is located in the campground. Each site allows parking for two vehicles and one watercraft. Self-contained propane barbecues, fire pits, and other heating devices must be CSA approved and be set up on level gravel, dirt, or sand, safely away from grass or plants. Fire pits are scattered throughout the park and campground areas. Firewood is provided at no cost. Bears do live in the park, so store food and dispose of garbage in air-tight containers. At Pickerel Point, guests can find the park store, concessions, and laundry facilities.

First-come first-served

Alternate camping

Seasonal activities in Duck Mountain Provincial Park

In-Season

Explore the Trails

The trail system at Duck Mountain Provincial Park features 93 miles (150 km) of walking, cycling, equestrian, and winter sport — cross-country skiing and snowmobiling — trails for guest use. The bike trail is paved and extends for 3 miles (4.8 km) through the forest. This trail is also ADA accessible. Additional trails vary in length and difficulty. Those looking for an easy stroll can enjoy the Fen Trail boardwalk. Those looking for a more serious hike can jump on a segment of the Trans Canada Trail that winds through the park in its entirety.

Boating

Duck Mountain Provincial Park includes Madge Lake, a 5.9 square mile (9.6 square km) body of water. The lake is popular with boaters and water recreation enthusiasts. Guests can drive motor boats or paddle canoes. Water skiing and windsurfing are especially popular. Five boat launch areas are located around the lake shore for public use. Note that there is a 3 mph (5 kph) speed limit for boats as they enter Ranger Bay.

Swimming

Duck Mountain Provincial Park offers visitors access to two swimming beaches. The first is located at Pickerel Point. The second is near the Ministik day use area. Both beaches are sand and gently slope into Madge Lake with adjacent grassy, open areas for sports and games. Guests can walk to restrooms and picnic areas. The beach at Ministik features a sand volleyball court. Lifeguards are not on duty at either beach, so guests should practice caution and never swim alone.

Off-Season

Winter Sports

During the winter months, Duck Mountain Provincial Park is one of the area’s top recreation spots. Snowmobilers enjoy 43 miles (70 km) of trails that explore the park’s backcountry. Cross-country skiers can access 37 miles (60 km) of groomed track with six warmup shelters along the way. An outdoor skating rink is set up when the weather turns cold at the Ministik beach parking lot. The toboggan hill near the skating rink is a family favorite. The ski area is open on weekends for skiers and snowboarders with 21 downhill runs.

Fishing

Duck Mountain Provincial Park features three lakes for fishermen to enjoy. Madge Lake is spring fed and is home to walleye, perch, and pike. Since Madge Lake is the largest lake in the park, there are three boat launches for fishermen who wish to fish on the water. Batka Lake also allows motorized boats, and, like Madge Lake, is stocked with pike, perch, and walleye. It has one boat launch located near the camp kitchen area. Jackfish Lake does not allow motorized boats, but fishermen can head out onto the water via canoe. It is about a five minute drive away from the campgrounds and is famous for its selection of yellow perch. Fishing licenses are available in the park.

Wildlife Watching

The lush forest and triad of lakes at Duck Mountain Provincial Park offer animals and birds a preserved area to call home. When the park was created, the flat land in the park was converted into cereal grain farmland. This land benefits a variety of large animals like black bear, lynx, bobcat, moose, elk, and timber wolf. White-tailed deer and coyotes are also a common site as they travel through the park and the surrounding agricultural areas. A variety of waterfowl nest on the lakeshore and in the marshes.

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