Hohokam Pima National Monument
Guide

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Introduction

To preserve and save the land and its rich history, the authorities have made Hohokam Pima National Monument off-limits to visitors, yet thousands of visitors come every year, why? Because the surrounding area is all about this community and where many of the locals are descendants of the Native Americans who used to live in Hohokam Pima so many years ago.

Snaketown was first excavated in the 1930s and then again in the 1960s by the Gila Pueblo Foundation. During the latter project, the site was re-buried for future research and to maintain its significance, as a result, there is nothing visible left above ground. The village was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1964 and a National Monument in 1972.

To this day, the same flat surface lies untouched and undisturbed to protect and preserve a very significant part of cultural history. For the same reason, visitors are not allowed on these grounds. Nonetheless, it serves as a center to the rich cultural history, and visitors learn and enjoy this culture via the community that surrounds it.

Ironically, while the area itself is off-limits to tourists, the surrounding area for up to 600-miles is a hub of tourist activity and spending a day or two there is one of the best ways to learn about the food, culture, and language of the people to whom this National Monument is dedicated.

To preserve and save the land and its rich history, the authorities have made Hohokam Pima National Monument off-limits to visitors, yet thousands of visitors come every year, why? Because the surrounding area is all about this community and where many of the locals are descendants of the Native Americans who used to live in Hohokam Pima so many years ago.

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RV Rentals in Hohokam Pima National Monument

Transportation in Hohokam Pima National Monument

Driving

Hohokam Pima National Monument is located 20 miles southeast of Phoenix, Arizona. From Chandler, Arizona, it is located 10 miles southwest.

The site is located within the Gila River Indian Community and the public is not allowed here. It is prohibited to set foot in the area, trespassing is illegal and would lead to arrest.

Parking

Public Transport

Campgrounds and parking in Hohokam Pima National Monument

Campsites in Hohokam Pima National Monument

Reservations camping

Lost Dutchman State Park

While Hohokam Pima does not have any RV parks of its own, there is a state park nearby where RV campers can stay overnight.

Lost Dutchman State Park is located a one hour drive away from Hohokam Pima National Monument, in the Sonoran Desert. This state park has a campground with 138 RV campsites. There are 68 sites that have electric (50, 30, or 20 amp) and water hookups. The remaining campsites are paved roads for RVs. All these sites come with a picnic table and a fire pit with an adjustable grill gate.

These campsites are also so big, that there are no size restrictions for RVs or trailers. Pets are also allowed on the sites as long as they are leashed and well-mannered.

First-come first-served

Alternate camping

Seasonal activities in Hohokam Pima National Monument

Spring

HuHuGam Cultural Center

The main reason behind visiting Hohokam Pima National Monument is to learn about the community that used to live here. HuHugam Cultural Center educates visitors about the culture, history, and language of the Native Americans that still live on these lands today.

The cultural center also exhibits a large collection of artifacts and cultural resources. Those who are truly fascinated by Native American culture can also take workshops and classes that focus on the community, their people, and their long-standing traditions.

Golfing

Another sought-after activity by the visitors of Hohokam Pima National Monument is golfing on this beautiful landscape. There are two popular golf courses in the area that have either 18 or 36 holes.

Challenge the other members of your group to a friendly competition while enjoying the wonderful Arizona weather.

Summer

Rawhide

Rawhide is one of the replica towns brought to life back from the pages of history. This attraction if very famous and one of the old-time classic historic places that almost everyone visits. Located at Wild Horse Pass, this replica town is the closest things you’ll get to see of what an 1880 frontier town looked like and the way of life of people then.

Anything and everything that was used back in the day is found in this replica town. Cookouts, stagecoach rides, gunfights, and real authentic cowboys. The place even allows you to stay and dine to get the full experience.

Fall

Heritage Markets

The HuHuGam Cultural Center also hosts specialty and heritage markets every once in a while. If you happen to land in the area around the same time as one of these markets, then you’d be lucky enough to purchase arts, crafts, and food from the local Native American community. Most of these markets are set up on the first Friday of every month, right outside the HuHugam Center.

Not only is it a great opportunity to ask questions and learn more from the Native Americans who still live in these parts, but also a chance to take home a token of the local culture while contributing towards preserving this fascinating and earth-loving culture.

Koli Equestrian Center

Horse riders would love to know that they can not only ride horses here but do so in the tribal lands of the Gila River Indian Community. Koli Equestrian Center is located in Chandler and a must-stop for keen equestrians.

The center offers a variety of different horseback options to visitors and allows them the perfect opportunity to view the area exactly as the inhabitants used to see it from their horses, centuries ago.

Winter

Casa Grande Ruins

The Casa Grande Ruins National Monument is located 30 miles and a 38 minute drive away from Hohokam Pima National Monument. Casa Grande Ruins includes a mysterious and highly complex network of communities and irrigation canals.

Among the ruins, the Great House, which used to be a meeting place and landmark of the desert people and stood for more than 650 years, is now restored to its original glory. The Ancestral Sonoran Desert People’s farming community here has also been restored for visitors to enjoy.

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