Twin Harbors State Park
Guide

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Introduction

Twin Harbors State Park boasts plenty of shoreline along the Pacific Ocean, a plethora of activities for every RVer, and a campground with almost 300 campsites. Located four miles south of Westport, Washington, Twin Harbors State Park is dissected by Washington Route 105, which runs north to south through the park. The 172-acre park is a favorite spot in the summer for family reunions and offers a lively atmosphere while camping. The park was created in 1937 when the state of Washington began to acquire land that was once a training ground for the U.S. Army. The last of the military structures were removed in the 1970s.

Twin Harbor State Park was once home to the Willapa Chinook, Lower Chehalis, and the Willapa Hills tribes. In 1866 the three tribes were bunched together to form the Shoalwater Bay Indian Tribe. The tribes survived for centuries on hunting, fishing, and gathering various foods from the area such as shellfish. Today, the tribe is located on a 335-acre reservation that is east of the park.

Twin Harbor State Park offers a natural playground for you to enjoy with activities that range from surfing, fishing, and hiking to beachcombing, kite flying, and relaxing on the beach. While you visit the park, there are ranger-led nature talks in the summer and excellent opportunities to view migrating whales in the Pacific Ocean in the winter.

The weather at Twin Harbor State Park has nice summertime temperatures in the 60s from May to October with up to three inches of rain in the spring and fall months. Winter temperatures can be in the high 40s to 50s with ten inches of rain per month.

RV Rentals in Twin Harbors State Park

Transportation in Twin Harbors State Park

Driving

You can access Twin Harbor State Park off of Washington Route 105 which bisects the park and the two campgrounds. If you are driving south to north from Grayland, Washington you will find an easy drive just off the coastline of the Pacific Ocean. Larger rigs will be able to make good time along the coastal prairie highway.

RVers and trailers will find driving north to south from Westport, Washington just as easy but there is more traffic congestion near the urban centers. The most challenging drive is from Laidlow and Bay City going east to west on Route 105. This drive will require you navigating a bridge that connects the two cities over the South Bay.

Once you arrive into the park, there will be plenty of congestion throughout with almost 300 campsites, plus day use areas, and large picnic pavilions for parties and family reunions. When you enter the campground area, there is one one-way road in the east campground that connects several loops and has numerous curves which are difficult for RVs and trailers that are longer than 35 feet to navigate.

The west campground is a single loop that offers easy driving and can be accessed from Route 105. You can also travel along the Schafer Beach Road which is located just north of the west campground and is accessed from Route 105. The road leads you to a day use area as well as a trail to the beach. Here you will find congestion in the summer months.

The best way for you to travel within the park is by bicycle. Remember when you are driving in the campgrounds to obey the posted speed limits. Drivers should be cautious within the campground loops where you may encounter bicyclists, pedestrians, and children playing.

Parking

Public Transport

Campgrounds and parking in Twin Harbors State Park

Campsites in Twin Harbors State Park

Reservations camping

West Campground

The West Campground at Twin Harbor State Park contains more than 100 campsites that boast an easy walk to the beach. This campground can be accessed directly from Route 105 where you will find the West Side Park Entrance. Campsites are tightly packed, and there is not much privacy between sites.

Each campsite contains a fire ring, picnic table and gravel parking pads for vehicles. There are flush toilets, showers and fresh water drinking stations located throughout the two loops. Most campsites on the west side are not large enough for RVs or trailers, and there are no services like hookups available. Generators may be used from 8:00 a.m. until 9:30 p.m. Pets must be restrained at all times by a six-foot leash.

East Campground

The East Campground at Twin Harbor State Park is situated within four loops and contains more than 85 campsites. You will find 49 campsites for RVs and trailers with partial hookups that include water and electricity in the first loop when you enter the campground. The partial-hookup sites are tightly clustered together, and there is little privacy at each site. RVs and trailers are limited to 35 feet in length.

Each campsite offers a fire ring, picnic ring, and gravel parking pads that may require leveling devices. There is a dump station located within the two loops. The tent campsites offer some shade from Sitka Pines, but privacy is still limited.

Within the loops, you will find flush toilets, showers, and fresh drinking water stations. Generators may be used from 8:00 a.m. until 9:30 p.m. Pets must be restrained by a six-foot leash at all times. The East Campground is generally closed during winter months, so plan accordingly.

First-come first-served

First-Come, First-Served

Campsites at Twin Harbor State Park are available on a first-come, first-served basis from mid-September to mid-April. Each campsite contains a fire ring, picnic table, and gravel parking pads for vehicles. Water is limited in the winter. Flush toilets, showers, and drinking stations might not be available due to weather and temperatures. Generators may be used from 8:00 a.m. until 9:30 p.m. Pets must be restrained at all times by a six-foot leash.

Alternate camping

Seasonal activities in Twin Harbors State Park

In-Season

Hiking

Hiking is a perfect activity in Twin Harbor State Park with more than three miles of trail. Once you park your campervan you can head down the Shifting Sands Nature Trail which is packed with interpretive signs explaining the fragile ecosystem of the area and is ideal for families. There are also trails that lead you through the dense forested inland areas that are loaded with birds and wildlife. The forests are a wonderland of different trees including Sitka spruce, Douglas fir, and western hemlock that tower into the sky.

Surfing

One of the more popular things to do in Twin Harbor State Park in the summer is surfing and windsurfing. You will find plenty of wind throughout the year to help lift you into the air and to keep you going at full steam while cruising atop the Pacific Ocean. Surfing is another activity that brings people to Twin Harbor State Park with both left and right breaks that offer constant swells. The best time for surfing is during high tide when you will find late-breaking waves not far from shore.

Fishing and Clamming

Surf fishing is a fun activity while you are at the park. You should always have your rod and reel ready when you are camping near the Pacific Ocean. Fish are abundant in the area, and you can expect to catch salmon, sea-run cutthroat trout, rockfish, and perch. Clamming is also popular at Twin Harbor State Park. The beach is perfect during low tide for razor clams. Before you dig or throw your line into the ocean, you should check state regulations for closures as well as bag and size limits

Off-Season

Storm Watching

Many people are thrilled with the vantage points to watch storms roll in from the Pacific Ocean during the winter. The storms bring big waves, lots of wind, and up to ten inches of rain at times, as well as plenty of electricity in the skies. Bring a good rain jacket and some hot chocolate for you to enjoy while taking in one of nature’s best shows. When you are storm watching be aware of lightning and high tides.

Whale Watching

During the winter months at Twin Harbor State Park, whale watching is a big attraction for RVers. Starting in late October gray whales from the colder northern waters of the Pacific Ocean begin to make their journey to Baja California where they will breed. Bring your binoculars because there are no real lookouts along the shoreline but you will find plenty of opportunities to see the whales swimming south from October to February and when they return north during March and April.

Beachcombing

Hiking is a perfect activity in Twin Harbor State Park with more than three miles of trail. Once you park your campervan, you can head down the Shifting Sands Nature Trail which is packed with interpretive signs explaining the fragile ecosystem of the area and is ideal for families. There are also trails that lead you through the densely forested inland areas that are loaded with birds and wildlife. The forests are a wonderland of different trees including Sitka spruce, Douglas fir, and western hemlock that tower into the sky.

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