White Rock Range Wilderness | Outdoorsy

White Rock Range Wilderness
Guide

Introduction

If the voice of adventure is calling your name, load up the RV and head out for a visit to Nevada's White Rock Range Wilderness. It's an amazing place for your next RV holiday.

White Rock Range Wilderness, an incredibly beautiful Bureau of Land Management property, is situated within Lincoln County, Nevada. A designated wilderness since 2004, this recreational area consists of 24,249 acres of land that is ripe for families to explore. White Rock Range Wilderness is a secluded property that sees little traffic year-round, making it the ideal spot for families looking for a private place in which to enjoy some R&R. The awe-inspiring mountains nestled on the premises are surrounded by rolling hills and vast tree cover, a picture-perfect sight to behold.

A broad range of wildlife makes White Rock Range Wilderness their home, including such species as elk, mule deer, hawks, and wild horses. Cougars and bobcats are also frequently spotted in the region. The pinnacle of the most prominent mountain, known as White Rock Peak, reaches an impressive height of 9,146 feet.

White Rock Range Wilderness rests along the Utah border, providing families with the opportunity to visit two states during their trip to this naturally landscaped property. The most popular recreational activities found here include hiking and camping. Dispersed camping can be found both within the wilderness itself as well as in several area campgrounds and state parks. There are several springs found directly on the grounds that offer a bountiful water supply for bathing and cooking, making camping conditions favorable.

For a wonderful vacation in the heart of the Nevada desert, plan a trip to White Rock Range Wilderness. You'll have an amazing time!

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Camping Accommodations

40'
Max RV length
40'
Max trailer Length
Electrical hookup
Water hookup
Generator use
Food storage
Sewer hookup
Dogs & cats

RV Rentals in White Rock Range Wilderness

Transportation

Driving

An extremely remote location, travel to White Rock Range Wilderness requires some driving and some hiking. From a paved two-lane road marked 13600 W, travelers will need to turn left onto a dirt road. This particular path winds through the desert in a curved path until it reaches a Y in the road. Here, travelers will need to turn right to continue along the route. The road will connect to Reeds Cabin Summit Road where travelers will need to continue to the right.

Direct access to the wilderness grounds can only be achieved on foot. Vehicles should be parked within 30 feet of the road. Four-wheel-drive access is permitted but can be difficult during wet weather.

Parking

There are no formally designated parking lots at White Rock Range Wilderness. An extremely remote locale, it is best to park all vehicles within 30 feet of Reeds Cabin Summit Road and proceed the remainder of the way on foot.

Public Transportation

There is no public transportation available to White Rock Range Wilderness.

Campgrounds and parking in White Rock Range Wilderness

Campsites in White Rock Range Wilderness

First-come first-served

Pahranagat Campground

Pahranagat Campground offers tent RV and tent camping year-round on a first-come, first-served basis. There are fifteen campsites which are nestled upon Upper Pahranagat Lake and offer incredible views of the water. There is no fee to use the premises; however, donations are encouraged.

Camping conditions here are primitive, offering only vault toilets on the grounds. There are no power or sewage hookups, and drinking water is not provided.

There is a maximum stay of 14 days permitted within each calendar month. Quiet time is observed each night from 10 PM to 7 AM.

Generator use is allowed; however, overnight use is forbidden due to noise restrictions.

Fires are only to be built in the rings and barbecues already situated on the grounds.

Beaver Dam State Park Campground

Beaver Dam State Park Campground offers two locations that are suited for RV and tent camping. Each of these spots offers campsites that are complete with a fire ring, a picnic table, and ample parking for both an RV and a car.

All campsites are provided on a first-come, first-served basis only. Drinking water is provided from April through November. All other times of the year, families must bring their own.

Vault toilets are housed on the grounds for public use.

Stays are restricted to 14 days per calendar month.

There is no waste disposal station found at this park.

Alternate camping

White Rock Wilderness Camping Areas

White Rock Range Wilderness Camping Areas are found in several spots throughout this property. There are no designated campsites, and no amenities are found on the premises.

Since access to this wilderness is challenging at best even on foot, tent camping is recommended. Families can try to reach the grounds by vehicle; however, this is best reserved for four-wheel-drive cars or trucks only.

Families must bring drinking water with them as none is provided on the grounds. However, water suitable for cooking and bathing can be obtained from the two on-site lakes.

All trash and waste materials must be taken with visitors when they move on.

Seasonal activities in White Rock Range Wilderness

In-Season

Pahranagat National Wildlife Refuge

Pahranagat National Wildlife Refuge is definitely worth stopping by when visiting White Rock Range Wilderness. The area is a haven for many different species of wildlife and is a natural habitat for many types of lush vegetation. Among the animals found on the grounds include many types of water birds, including several varieties that are currently on the endangered list.

The property rests within a small agricultural area in a town known as Alamo. Pahranagat National Wildlife Refuge received its designation as a nationally protected site in 1963.

In addition to being a haven for such indigenous creatures as the Mojave rattlesnake, the desert tortoise, and the tundra swan, the property also pays homage to its history as a settlement for the Paiute Native Americans.

Pahranaagat translates to "valley of shining water," a handle that is particularly appropriate given the land's status as a wetland in the midst of two important desert locales: the Mojave and the Great Basin.

Kershaw-Ryan State Park

Kershaw-Ryan State Park offers families the opportunity to experience some of the finest outdoor recreation in the state. This recreational area sits in the midst of a canyon that is awash in a sea of rich colors, a beautiful sight to behold. Located in the heart of the desert, the land found here is diverse and rough but supports a wide variety of plant life including wildflowers, grapevines, and many species of fruit trees. Also found on the grounds is a crystal clear pond which is ideal for wading or just a quick refreshing dip.

Wild horses are also known to roam throughout the premises, a true delight to all who see them. Other popular activities here include hiking, picnicking, and year-round camping.

Leviathan Cave

Leviathan Cave is found a little off the beaten track but is well worth the journey to get there. The cave, which is located within the Worthington Mountain Range, is the product of a sinkhole. Though the region boasts of many caves, this one is unique for its sheer size alone which is large enough to easily be glimpsed on Google Earth. The cave mouth measures from 160 feet to 80 feet across the opening.

To reach the cave, it is necessary to hike. The hiking conditions here are very vigorous, so this trip is best reserved for those in excellent physical condition to avoid accident or injury. Access to the cave itself is only obtained through the use of ropes. Rappeling is required.

The entire journey to the cave and back to the starting point is nearly four miles and covers 2,200 feet in total elevation.

Off-Season

Echo Canyon State Park

Echo Canyon State Park is another beautiful recreational area worth a visit during a trip to White Rock Range Wilderness. This park is open year-round for families to enjoy and offers a wide variety of fun and interesting things to do.

Found on the premises is a reservoir that is 65 acres in total. This spot is the ideal locale for such outdoor activities as boating, swimming, and fishing. Many water birds also frequent the region including mallards, teals, and herons. The most popular fish species found within the reservoir are rainbow trout, crappie, and largemouth bass.

Camping and hiking are also popular attractions at this beloved recreational area.

Mormon Mountains

For those who love to hike, the Mormon Mountains are a must-visit destination. The surrounding landscape is littered with such vegetation as cholla, yucca, and Joshua trees. Abundant tree cover is sprinkled throughout the grounds, providing both beauty and shade.

The sheer magnitude of the Mormon Mountains is indescribable. Having a camera along is a must for this trip.

The elevation of the mountains climbs from 2,200 feet to 7,414 feet in total. A haven for many species of wildlife the desert tortoise and the banded Gila monster flourish at lower levels with desert bighorn sheep and mountain lions laying climb to higher elevations.

Be prepared for strenuous hiking conditions here.

Elgin Schoolhouse State Historic Site

The Elgin Schoolhouse State Historic Site is a very interesting spot to spend an afternoon. The schoolhouse which still stands on the property was once the primary educational center for many generations of children. The school consisted of only one room, and children from Grades 1 through 8 were all taught in this small space. The schoolhouse was in operation from 1922 through 1967.

In 1924, a small building was constructed on the premises to provide housing for the teacher.

The schoolhouse still houses many of the artifacts used when the school was still in operation. Tours of the facility can be arranged by contacting Kershaw-Ryan State Park.