Leslie Carvitto
by Leslie Carvitto
Posted August 31, 2019

With over 7,500 miles of coastline and 118 surf breaks (that we know of), the West Coast is a pure paradise for surfers. There are unlimited choices when it comes to where to park your RV, so we compiled a list of the best camp spots to keep you close to the waves of the nations most fabulous surf destinations.  

Canada: Vancouver Island 

 

Surf Junction Campground: Pack your thickest wetsuit and head all the way up to Vancouver Island in Canada. Situated at the entrance of Pacific Rim National Park and the UNESCO World Biosphere Reserve, we guarantee that Surf Junction is one of the most beautiful camp spots you’ll ever rest your head at. The camp is set up over 18 sprawling acres and a short 5-minute drive to Long Beach, a spot know for its consistent waves. Post-surf-session, get your body temperature back to normal by relaxing in the camp’s hot tub or sauna. Surf Junction also offers group and private surf lessons if you’re a beginner or looking to improve your skills. 

 

Washington:

 

Quileute Oceanside Resort & RV Park: 


There aren’t an abundance of spots to surf in Washington, but if you’re willing to take a longer drive, you’ll find them. The Quileute Oceanside Resort & RV Park in La Push is the perfect place to park your RV and explore the states rugged coastline (or the town of Forks if you’re a die-hard Twilight fan). La Push is one of the most popular surfing spots on the Peninsula with the best conditions being in the fall or spring.

LOGE Westport:

The Loge Camp in Westport is inspired by the surf and camp culture of the 1970s and offers RV hookups and bathrooms with hot showers. A covered outdoor kitchen is yours to use and their event schedule flourishes with weekend concerts featuring local talent. If you’re in need of gear, you’re in luck. Loge has partnered with Seattle based outdoor company Evo to bring you rentals that get you out of camp and into the water. Not to mention, there’s an on-site cafe that serves coffee, beer, and snacks to refuel after your water session. 

Oregon: 

 

Nehalem Bay State Park:

Cold wave surfing isn’t for everyone, but Oregon’s gorgeous coastline is a good place to give it a try.  Conveniently located close to the town of Manzanita, the campground is great for families with plenty of parks in the area and easy access to the beach. And while the sites are relatively close together, there’s an abundance of pine trees to help aid privacy. Grab your board or rent your gear from Bahama Mama’s (the sole surf shop in Manzanita) and paddle out for some clean and fun-sized waves. 

 

 

Beverly Beach State Park:

This campground is located north of Newport, OR and we suggest parking the RV for a few days to really explore the area. The campground is well-maintained with a visitor’s center and a variety of events planned in the summer months. Walk the lovely nature trail that leads down to the beach and stop to look at the old-growth trees along the way.  The beach (Otter Rock) is popular with beginner surfers and longboarders. The swell picks up in the summer but soft-rolling, mushy waves can be found any time of the year. 

 

 

California: 

 

Seacliff State Beach, Santa Cruz, CA 


You don’t get the nickname “surf city” without great beaches and breaking waves to back it up. One of the most popular beachfront campgrounds in Santa Cruz is Seacliff State Beach. This camp is for RV’s only and has 26 full hookup sites, 37 non-hookup sites, and two miles of shoreline with picnic areas and BBQ grills. No matter what beach you camp at, you’re within striking distance of great waves. Manresa Beach just south of the campground has a broad section of consistent beach break.

 

 

Morro Dunes RV Park: 

Atascadero Beach provides nine miles of pristine coastline and the Morro Dunes RV park is steps away from it and the iconic Morrow Rock. A quick look at the ocean will tell you if the surf is big and powerful, or fun and small. Morro Beach gets a variety of waves and can be great at any tide, so expect a bit of a crowd on most days. Once you’ve caught enough waves, walk the 10 minutes into the town of Morro Bay for some fish tacos and craft beer.

Emma Wood State Beach, Ventura 

Emma Wood State Beach offers primitive camping for fully self-contained vehicles. And while it may lack in amenities (such as restrooms and water), it makes up for it with as most campsites are literally on the beach. Rolling out of bed and into your wetsuit has never been easier. This fairly exposed beach and reef break have reliable surf with summer offering the most favorable conditions.

San Onofre State Beach:

If you’re a surfer in California, not much compares to San Onofre. The best surfers from around the world come here to for the year-round waves and well-maintained beach. That being said, this spot is better for intermediate to experienced surfers who can make friends and respect the locals. The campground is located on Old Highway 101, adjacent to the beautiful sandstone bluffs. Fall and winter are the best times to book here, especially if you’re looking for some peace and quiet. Nearby Waves include San-O, Church, Trestles, T-Street.


San Elijo State Beach, Cardiff-by-the-sea 


This popular campground on the San Diego coast is perched on the edge of a bluff boasting other-worldly views. $60+/night will score you an oceanfront property (for a few days at least) that people pay millions in real estate to have. Picture this: you can wake up in the morning, sip your coffee and watch the waves from the bluff until you find the perfect moment to grab your board and head out for a surf. A camp store and snack bar is located near the campground entrance and operates March through December and provides RV supplies, boogie boards, and firewood.

Leslie Carvitto

 

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