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RV Speed Limits For All 50 States


The United States may be united as one nation, but each state has their own set of rules when it comes to highway safety. As an RV enthusiast, you want to be aware of the rules of the states you will be traveling in. Speed limits are one of the tricky areas and the one you are most likely to run into trouble with. Even within each state, different roads can have their own variations.

Beyond what the speed limit says, you need to make sure you are driving at a speed that is safe for your RV and which takes into account the conditions you are driving in. If you find your trailer is swaying or your motorhome feels unstable, you are likely going too fast and should slow down. (Read more about trailer towing here).

Understanding the Rules

Ultimately, the best rule of thumb is to simply follow the posted speed limits on the road to avoid a ticket and follow the laws of the state. However, it’s important to note that some states have different rules for certain types of vehicles and trailers. Oftentimes, this comes in the form of special speed limits for large trucks, which include large RVs. Typically, any rig over 8,000 pounds or with more than two axles will have to follow the truck speed limits if the state has them. Another common rule is that such traffic must keep to the right lane of a highway when there is more than one lane.

A few states have rules specific to “mobile homes” or “trailer houses” that are being towed. These are not the same thing as your typical travel trailer or 5th wheel. Instead, these laws refer to the kinds of trailers and manufactured homes that can be towed as a trailer, but are normally anchored to the ground when occupied. We will list them here for those who tow a tiny home or other trailers not designed specifically for regular road travel.

The speed limits that follow are maximum highway speeds. Not all highways in the state will use the maximum speeds, so be sure to abide by the posted limits. These car, truck, and trailer towing speed limits were collected in May 2020 with the help of AAA and the National Motorists Association.

RV Speed Limits For All 50 States | Outdoorsy RV Rental Marketplace
Photo by: Sigfried Trent

Alabama

RV Speed Limit: 70 mph for cars and trucks on rural interstates; 65 mph for urban interstates. Trailer towing speeds must be reasonable and proper.

Notes: Riding in a trailer is prohibited.

Alaska

RV Speed Limit: Alaska’s default speed limit for trucks and cars is 55 mph, but may reach 65 mph on select interstates. Mobile home tow is limited to 45 mph.

Notes: Speed limits on the Alaska Canadian highway vary between 80 and 100 kilometers per hour. You can even rent an RV in Canada!

Arizona

RV Speed Limit: 75 mph for cars and trucks on rural interstates; 65 mph for urban interstates. Vehicles towing trailers may not exceed rate of speed that causes lateral sway.

Notes: Allows triple towing.

Arkansas

RV Speed Limit: 70 mph for cars and trucks on rural interstates; 65 mph for cars and trucks and 55 mph for trailer tow on urban interstates. Mobile home tow is limited to 45 mph.

Notes: Follow truck highway rules for most RVs.

California

RV Speed Limit: 55 mph for trucks and trailers on rural and urban interstates.

Notes: Class A motorhomes should follow truck speeds.

Colorado

RV Speed Limit: 75 mph on rural interstates, 65 mph on urban interstates. Trailer speed limit is same as cars.

Notes: Has special night-time speed limits on some highways in some seasons.

Connecticut

RV Speed Limit: 65 mph on rural interstates, 55 mph on urban interstates.

Notes: No unusual restrictions.

Delaware

RV Speed Limit: 65 mph for cars on rural and urban interstates; 55 mph for trucks.

Notes: No unusual restrictions.

Florida

RV Speed Limit: 70 mph for cars and trucks on rural interstates; 65 mph for urban interstates.

Notes: No unusual restrictions.

Georgia

RV Speed Limit: 70 mph for cars and trucks on rural interstates; 55 mph for urban interstates.

Notes: Allows unusually long trailers and RVs, up to 100′.

 

RV Speed Limits For All 50 States | Outdoorsy RV Rental Marketplace
Photo by: Sigfried Trent

Hawaii

RV Speed Limit: 60 mph for cars and trucks on rural and urban interstates.

Notes: They have the lowest speed limits of any state, and yes there are RVs to rent in Hawaii.

Idaho

RV Speed Limit: 70 mph for trucks on rural interstates and 65 mph for cars and trucks on urban interstates.

Notes: Follow truck highway rules for most RVs.

Illinois

RV Speed Limit: 70 mph for cars and trucks on rural interstates; 55 mph for cars and trucks on urban interstates.

Notes: Riding in a trailer is prohibited.

Indiana

RV Speed Limit: 65 mph for trucks on rural interstates, 55 mph for trucks on urban interstates.

Notes: Follow truck highway rules for most RVs. Riding in a trailer is permitted.

Iowa

RV Speed Limit: 70 mph for cars and trucks on rural interstates, 55 mph for trucks on urban interstates.

Notes: Riding in a trailer is permitted.

Kansas

RV Speed Limit: 75 mph for cars and trucks on rural interstates; 70 mph for cars and trucks on urban interstates. Mobile home towing is limited to 55 mph.

Notes: No unusual restrictions.

Kentucky

RV Speed Limit: 65 mph for cars and trucks on rural and urban interstates. Some sections of interstate may have a higher limit.

Notes: Riding in a trailer is permitted.

Louisiana

RV Speed Limit: 75 mph for cars and trucks on rural interstates; 70 mph for cars and trucks on urban interstates. Mobile home towing is limited to 55 mph.

Notes: Riding in a trailer is prohibited. Triple towing is allowed.

Maine

RV Speed Limit: Speed limits for cars and trucks vary between 65 mph and 75 mph on rural interstates and 50 mph to 70 mph on urban interstates.

Notes: Riding in a trailer is prohibited.

Maryland

RV Speed Limit: 70 mph for cars and trucks on rural interstates; 65 mph for cars and trucks on urban interstates.

Notes: They have some of the most extensive regulations on size, lighting, and other trailer and tow vehicle equipment. Riding in a trailer is prohibited.

RV Speed Limits For All 50 States | Outdoorsy RV Rental Marketplace
Photo by: Sigfried Trent

Massachusetts

RV Speed Limit: Car and truck speed limits on all freeways is 65 mph.

Notes: Riding in a trailer is prohibited.

Michigan

RV Speed Limit: Truck speed limit on rural interstates is 65 mph. On urban interstates, 60 mph unless the limit for cars is under 70 mph. In that case, the truck speed limit is 55 mph.

Notes: Follow truck highway rules for most RVs. Riding in a trailer is permitted.

Minnesota

RV Speed Limit: 70 mph for cars and trucks on rural interstates. Speed limits vary on urban interstates.

Notes: No unusual restrictions.

Mississippi

RV Speed Limit: 70 mph for cars and trucks on all interstates.

Notes: Riding in a trailer is permitted.

Missouri

RV Speed Limit: 70 mph for cars and trucks on rural interstates; 60 mph for cars and trucks on urban interstates.

Notes: Riding in a trailer is permitted.

Montana

RV Speed Limit: 65 mph for trucks on rural and urban interstates.

Notes: Montana has lower speed limits for night driving on many roadways. Follow truck highway rules for most RVs.

Nebraska

RV Speed Limit:

75 mph for cars and trucks on rural interstates; 65 mph for cars and trucks on urban interstates. Mobile home towing is limited at 55 mph.

Notes: Riding in a trailer is permitted.

Nevada

RV Speed Limit: 80 mph for cars and trucks on rural interstates; 65 mph for cars and trucks on urban interstates.

Notes: Riding in a trailer is prohibited.

New Hampshire

RV Speed Limit: 65 mph for cars and trucks on rural interstates; 65 mph for cars and trucks on urban interstates. Some areas may have a limit of 70 mph.

Notes: Riding in a trailer is prohibited.

New Jersey

RV Speed Limit: 65 mph for cars and trucks on rural interstates; 55 mph for cars and trucks on urban interstates.

Notes: Riding in a trailer is permitted.

RV Speed Limits For All 50 States | Outdoorsy RV Rental Marketplace
Photo by: Sigfried Trent

New Mexico

RV Speed Limit: 75 mph for cars and trucks on rural interstates; 65 mph for cars and trucks on urban interstates.

Notes: Night-time speed limits are generally 5-10 mph lower. Riding in a trailer is permitted.

New York

RV Speed Limit: 65 mph for cars and trucks on rural interstates; 55 mph for cars and trucks on urban interstates.

Notes: Riding in a trailer is permitted.

North Carolina

RV Speed Limit: 70 mph for cars and trucks on rural and urban interstates. Mobile home towing is limited 55.

Notes: Riding in a trailer is permitted.

North Dakota

RV Speed Limit: 75 mph for cars and trucks on rural and urban interstates.

Notes: Riding in a trailer is prohibited.

Ohio

RV Speed Limit: 70 mph for cars and trucks on rural interstates; 65 mph for cars and trucks on urban interstates. If combine truck/trailer combo exceeds 8,000 lbs, speed limit is 55 mph.

Notes: Riding in a trailer is prohibited.

Oklahoma

RV Speed Limit: 70 mph for cars and trucks on rural interstates; 65 mph for cars and trucks on urban interstates.

Notes: Riding in a trailer is permitted.

Oregon

RV Speed Limit: 60 mph for trucks on rural interstates; 55 mph for trucks on urban interstates. Some areas may vary.

Notes: Follow truck highway rules for most RVs. Riding in a trailer is only permitted with a 5th wheel when there is an intercom in place and the glass meets certain safety standards. Otherwise riding in a trailer is prohibited.

Pennsylvania

RV Speed Limit: 65 mph for trucks and cars on urban and rural interstates. Some areas may be 70 mph.

Notes: Riding in a trailer is only permitted with a 5th wheel when there is an intercom in place and the glass meets certain safety standards. Otherwise, riding in a trailer is prohibited.

Rhode Island

RV Speed Limit: 65 mph for cars and trucks on rural interstates; 55 mph for cars and trucks on urban interstates.

Notes: Riding in a trailer is permitted.

South Carolina

RV Speed Limit: 70 mph for cars and trucks on rural and urban interstates. A vehicle towing a house trailer must not drive faster than 45 mph.

Notes: Riding in a trailer is prohibited.

RV Speed Limits For All 50 States | Outdoorsy RV Rental Marketplace
Photo by: Sigfried Trent

South Dakota

RV Speed Limit: 80 mph for cars and trucks on rural and urban interstates.

Notes: Riding in a trailer is permitted.

Tennessee

RV Speed Limit: 70 mph for cars and trucks on rural and urban interstates.

Notes: Riding in a trailer is permitted.

Texas

RV Speed Limit: Interstate speeds differ. Most rural speed limits are 75 mph, but some stretches of freeway have a limit of 80-85 mph.

Notes: One tollway has a max speed of 85, the highest in the U.S.

Utah

RV Speed Limit: 75 mph for trucks on rural interstates; 65 mph for trucks on urban interstates.

Notes: Riding in a trailer is prohibited.

Vermont

RV Speed Limit: 65 mph for cars and trucks on rural interstates; 55 mph for cars and trucks on urban interstates.

Notes: Riding in a trailer is prohibited. No triple towing allowed.

Virginia

RV Speed Limit: 70 mph for cars and trucks on rural and urban interstates.

Notes: Riding in a trailer is prohibited.

Washington

RV Speed Limit: 60 mph for trucks on rural interstates; 60 mph for cars and trucks on urbaninterstates.

Notes: Follow truck highway rules for most RVs. Riding in a trailer is prohibited.

West Virginia

RV Speed Limit: 70 mph for cars and trucks on rural interstates; 60 mph for cars and trucks on urban interstates. Trailer towing is limited to 55 mph unless otherwise posted.

Notes: Riding in a trailer is permitted.

Wisconsin

RV Speed Limit: 70 mph for cars and trucks on rural and urban interstates.

Notes: Passengers in a towed vehicle must be over the age of 13.

Wyoming

RV Speed Limit: 75 mph for cars and trucks on rural and urban interstates.

Notes: Riding in a trailer is prohibited.

RV Speed Limits For All 50 States | Outdoorsy RV Rental Marketplace
Photo by: Sigfried Trent

Final advice

The RV lifestyle is not about hurrying from place to place, but enjoying a grand journey and exploring your world with eyes wide open. Always put your safety above your desire to get from A to B quickly. Following the posted speed limits, or close to them, is a good idea. And if you feel a slower speed is safer, go slower and stay safe.

Top end navigation systems like Garmin are capable of giving you up-to-date speed limits based on your vehicle specifications wherever you go. If you choose to use one, be sure to keep it updated with the latest information from the navigation company. Otherwise, it could misinform you because speed limits do change over time. Also, like any technology, it is not a substitute for paying attention to posted signs or using your own good judgment.

Feeling ready to hit the road and find some adventure? Search for a great RV in your state today on outdoorsy!

 

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