Daingerfield State Park
RV & Trailer Guide

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Introduction

The current 507-acre Daingerfield State Park was originally privately owned but was deeded to the state of Texas in 1935 to help create a state park. The Civilians Conservation Corps took four years to complete the park and it was officially opened in 1939. They created many of the original structures including the 80-acre spring-fed lake called Little Pine Lake. The park is surrounded by pine and deciduous trees providing a lovely barrier from the hot summer sun.

Daingerfield State Park is open all year but its peak season begins in mid-March and trickles off in late-November. During the peak season, you and your family can enjoy fishing on Little Pine Lake, hiking on the trail around the lake, or even joining the Saturday dance nights featuring old school jukebox tunes, karaoke, and live music. In the off-season, you can enjoy viewing over 300 species of birds that call Texas home or even go geocaching.

The park offers 40 full hookups sites for RV camping. There are three campgrounds offering back-in and pull-through sites. Daingerfield State Park offers new activities each season with First Day Hikes on New Year’s Day for the whole family, junior ranger programs for children, and a beautiful lake view all year long. Whenever you decide to visit Daingerfield State Park in your RV, there’s always something fun for everyone.

Camping Accommodations

60’
Max RV length
60’
Max trailer length
Electrical hookup
Water hookup
Generator use
Food storage
Sewer hookup
Dogs & cats

RV Rentals in Daingerfield State Park

Transportation in Daingerfield State Park

Located 30 miles northwest of the pre-Civil War town of Jefferson and lying on the outskirts of the town of Daingerfield, the park is nestled in the heart of historic Texas. Taking State Highway 49 will lead you straight to the park’s entrance. The road leading into the park is paved, but drive slowly nonetheless to prevent jostling around, as there is the occasional pothole.

You can pick up a map of the park from the park’s headquarters. If you need to stock up on groceries, you can stop by the town of Daingerfield before you get to the park. The town is just over two miles away from the park and a simple four-minute drive to restaurants and boutiques.

If you arrive to the park later than anticipated, be sure to call ahead and let the park staff know that you are running late, so that they can give you the gate code. There is also a self-check-in post at the headquarters for the park which opens in the evening. It is recommended that you walk or ride your bike to experience the park in its full beauty. In case of inclement weather, the park will close so please check the forecast before you head out for your weekend getaway.

Campgrounds and parking in Daingerfield State Park

Campsites in Daingerfield State Park

Dogwood Loop Campground

This campground offers full hookups for smaller RVs and trailers with a limit of 30 feet in length. The 17 sites are shaded and provide a decent amount of privacy from your neighbor. The electrical hookup only offers 30 amp. Amenities include hot showers, restrooms, a picnic table, water, a fire ring, a grill, and a lantern post. The Rustic Leaves Trail is nearby, offering you a chance to get a few steps in around the lake. Remember that you are prohibited from bringing your own firewood and the gathering of firewood is also prohibited, but you can pick some up at the camp store. If you are not sure about the rules of camping, then pick up a park guide on your way in at the park’s headquarters. Be sure to pick up any trash you see to keep the park looking beautiful. You can stay up to 14 nights here and reservations are available 11 months in advance.

Big Pine Campground

Big Pine Campground is considered the park's premium campground. It has 10 sites with full hookups available. Larger RVs and trailers are welcome to reserve a spot. Big Pine Campground has a beautiful view of the lake, but for the best view sites six through 10 are recommended. Amenities included are hot showers, restrooms, a grill, a picnic table, and a fire ring. You can pick up ice and firewood from the camp store and park’s headquarters. You can also find a park map, all the rules regarding how to keep the park clean, and where you can park your car. There are 20, 30, 50 amp electric hookups available for you to choose from, and the sites are leveled and shaded. You’ll also have plenty of space and privacy with trees and shrubs separating you from your neighbor. You can stay a maximum of 14 nights and can reserve your spot up to 11 months in advance.

Mountain View Campground

Mountain View Campground is located near the base of Mountain View Trail. If you have a trailer or RV that’s 30 feet or less, then this may be the perfect spot for you. This campground offers full hookups with a 30 amp electric hookup available. Mountain View Campground, just like the rest of the park, is beautiful all year-round, but especially in the spring and autumn. You can hike up the challenging Mountain View Trail and have a lovely picnic while basking in the warm sun and beautiful scenery. Amenities include a fire ring, a grill, lantern posts, hot showers, restrooms, and a picnic table. The sites are level and paved making getting around very easy even in rainy weather. Be considerate of the park animals and refrain from feeding them. Also, be sure to properly throw away your trash. You are prohibited from bringing your own firewood, but the camp store has firewood, ice, and other treats. You can reserve an RV campsite up to 11 months in advance and can stay up to 14 nights at a time.

Cedar Ridge Campground

If you have a friend tagging along who doesn't have an RV, the Cedar Ridge Campground is a perfect option. This campground is open for tent campers, featuring a picnic table, outdoor grill, and fire ring. A picnic area, restrooms, and showers are within walking distance. Generator use is permitted during the day. These campsites are located in a beautiful spot shaded by the forest with a tent pad provided. However, you'll want to make sure you follow all the campground rules such as properly throwing away your trash. You are prohibited from bringing your own firewood, but the camp store has firewood, ice, and other treats. Reservations can be made up to 11 months in advance.

First-Come, First-Served

If you are planning a spontaneous trip to Daingerfield State Park there may be a spot open for your. A select number of campsites are available on a first-come, first-served basis at Mountain View or Dogwood Campgrounds. However, especially during the peak season, reservations are recommended. Most sites can accomdates tents or RVs up to 30 feet in length. A few sites can hold RVs up to 50 feet long.

Seasonal activities in Daingerfield State Park

Fishing

Little Pine Lake is a spring-fed lake that was built by the Civilian Conservation Corps in the late 1930s. Stocked with blue catfish, large-mouth bass, perch, crappie, and rainbow trout, the lake is a great place to spend the day fishing. You can take your boat out on the lake, but you have to abide by the five-mile-per-hour rule while on the water. If you do not have a boat, then you can rent one from the camp store for a reasonable price. The camp store also offers bait and rods. You do not need a license to fish from the shore or a boat in the park, so be sure to pack your rod and tackle box in your rig.

Attending a Saturday Dance Night

Each Saturday night during the peak season from mid-March to late-November, the park hosts a dance for all its visitors to participate in. This is a great opportunity to get to know your neighbors and eat some delicious food. The park also offers karaoke and live performances to liven up the night. So put on your dancing shoes and get a little loose on the dance floor. Rest assured that you will enjoy your time and maybe even sweat a little bit.

Canoeing

You can rent a canoe from the park’s store year-round at a reasonable price. Take your time to explore the 80-acre lake and observe the different plants and animals as you glide along the lake. Lifejackets and oars are available for rent as well. You could paddle along the edge of the lake and run your fingers through the cool water. Remember to leave all electronics back at your campsite to prevent them from getting wet or falling in. If you bring a snack with you, please be mindful of the environment and take your trash when you leave.

Birding

There are over 300 species of birds that call Texas home. Throughout the year you can see the different types of birds including the Painted Bunting, a relative of the cardinal family. Due to its colorful wings and underbelly, it is often called a living rainbow. You can pick up a bird list at the park’s headquarters. Remember to bring your binoculars and pack a sturdy pair of walking boots in your camper. If you plan to do a day of birding then explore the Mountain View Trail and pack a snack and some water with you.

Hiking

There are two trails for you to enjoy during your RV stay at Daingerfield: Mountain View Trail and Rustic Leaves Trail. Mountain View Trail is the harder trail of the two with a steady incline leading you to the highest point in the park. You can take a hike up this difficult trail and enjoy the view of the entire park from the top of the mountain. Rustic Leaves Trail is a two-mile trail that almost goes along the circumference of the lake. Remember to wear comfortable shoes and leave nature as you found it on your hike.

Geocaching

You can be a modern-day pirate and go treasure hunting with your family and friends with geocaching. Geocaching is simple to play and requires a spirit of adventure, a pen or pencil, sturdy walking boots, a device with GPS capabilities, a water bottle, and your own personal treasure to trade. Before you go explore make sure you know the rules of logging your cache. Be sure to leave a cache area as you found it to keep the adventure alive.