Top 25 Fort Casey State Park, WA RV Rentals and Motorhome Rentals

RV Rental Fort Casey State Park

Find the perfect RV rental in Fort Casey State Park, WA. Simple, easy, and fully insured.

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All towables

Trailer

Trailers for all types of towing vehicles, including SUVs and pickups.

Folding Trailer

Trailers you can tow with passenger vehicles or SUVs. A great way to transform average cars into adventure cars.

Fifth-Wheel

Larger trailers that attach to towing vehicles with a gooseneck extension in the truck bed.

Toy Hauler

Living quarters in the front with dedicated space for hauling motorcycles or other “toys” in the back.

Utility Trailer

All other types of towable trailers.

All drivables

Class C

Popular with small families and first-time RV drivers who want a little more room than a van. Comparable to driving a truck.

Camper Van

The smallest and nimblest of fully enclosed RVs. Drives like a van. Loves posing for Instagram.

Class B

A formal-sounding name for camper van, but just as photogenic.

Class A

Drivers should be comfortable driving bus-sized vehicles and dealing with parking limitations. Great for delivery.

Truck Camper

If you can drive a truck, you can drive a truck camper. Makes roughing it significantly less rough.

Other

All other types of drivable vehicles.

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RV camping at Fort Casey State Park is a great way to see the collection of islands north of Seattle, in the Puget Sound. When you book an RV in Island County, you’ll have easy access to all the islands have to offer, and by taking the ferry system, it is possible to make it back to the mainland easily. Fort Casey State Park was originally created in 1955 after Washington State Parks acquired the land. The park rests on the spot where, starting in the late 1800s, the U.S. Army held the position as a defensive and resupplying depot.

Over time Fort Casey was slowly abandoned, one piece at a time. It wasn’t until the park system acquired it that it started to be heavily used by the public. Fort Casey State Park is across the water from Port Townsend, but for guests looking for bigger cities, they will have to head inland to either Everett or Burlington, depending on their chosen direction. The islands in the Puget Sound are gorgeous, and a great way to see them is by camping with an RV.

Discover Fort Casey State Park


Getting Outdoors

Being located so close to the Puget Sound, as this state park is, makes exploring these majestic waters as easy as walking out the front door of your rental RV. The biggest attraction of this state park is the ability to explore the sandy shores of where the island meets the water, both at the Puget Sound as well as nearby Crockett Lake. Boating is allowed on the lake and in the sound, and vacationers can swim in each as they prefer.

When it comes to interacting with the wildlife, visitors can fish and search out crabs and clams when they have the appropriate licenses. Maintaining balance in the ecosystem is very important, so be sure not to take more than the allotted amount of fish, crabs, or clams even when having really good luck catching them. There is a pier that you can fish from, and during low tide, the beaches are the best place to seek out clams.

The park is also a great place to walk and immerse yourself in nature. There are a few trails that are fun to explore, and bird watching is a popular activity at the park. During certain times of the year, the island is a popular place from which to watch migrating whales. Check out migration calendars and book your RV rental accordingly if that is something you are interested in.

Camping at Fort Casey State Park

With over ten different campsites to choose from, camping at Fort Casey State Park is easy and enjoyable so long as you arrange your reservations accordingly. The RV sites at the park have water and electricity, and the maximum length of RV allowed is 40-feet. Those who stay at this campground will enjoy the distant sounds of waves on the beach, in addition to moderate privacy and low noise levels thanks to local trees and bushes in the campground.

Amenities at the campground are a bit sparse, but they still check most of the boxes that are available at other places. There are flushing toilets and hot showers, which is a huge perk, and they are centrally located for all campers to use. There are almost 70 different picnic tables scattered throughout the park for guests to use as they desire, on a first come first served basis of course. There is also a fire circle, a camp store, and onsite rangers to answer any questions you may have.

Exploring the Area

State Park RV camping is a great way to see a new area, and while exploring Island County, you’ll have your fair share of both indoor and outdoor attractions to explore. Port Townsend is only a ferry ride away and has many different types of restaurants for guests to enjoy. The main focus of restaurants in the town is seafood, but it is still easily possible to find Italian, Mexican, American, and other restaurants lining this small town’s streets.

Port Townsend is also the easiest place to find fuel for your RV, though for outdoor adventurists who want to avoid the ferry, head north to Coupeville. The selection is a bit more sparse in Coupeville, but it can still easily accommodate RVs without any trouble. The Coupeville Wharf is a pier based museum that is definitely worth checking out. It has information on local sea-based life and the animals that inhabit the island.

The Jefferson Museum of Art & History is probably one of the best places in the area to find information on the local history, and it is located in Port Townsend. This museum contains artifacts and exhibits from a time past and artwork from local artists that tell a story of living on the islands. The museum lives in a 19-century courthouse building and still contains the original jail and fire hall for you to explore.

Popular nearby hiking trails and campgrounds


  • Hiking TrailLocation
  • Ebey's Landing Trail, WAEbey's Landing National Historical Reserve, WA
  • Central Whidbey Island: Coupeville and Fort Casey, WAFort Ebey State Park, WA
  • Point Wilson Trail, WAPort Townsend, WA
  • Fort Flagler Trail, WAFort Flagler State Park, WA
  • Fort Ebey State Park Loop, WAFort Ebey State Park, WA
  • Larry Scott Trail, WAPort Townsend, WA
  • Olympic Discovery Trail, WAPort Townsend, WA
  • Cranberry Lake, WAGreenbank, WA
  • Ridge Loop Trail , WAFreeland, WA
  • South Indian Island Trail, WAChimacum, WA

Frequently Asked Questions


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